Saturday, October 9, 2010

October JFP

I have not had the opportunity to scrutinize it carefully yet, but the JFP looks pretty bad-- at least as bad as last year's. Although the overall number of ads seems like an improvement, there seems to be a sizable portion of open rank positions and non tt positions. Moreover, many of the "web only" ads are repeats of the summer ads, and I'll bet that may of the remaining "web onlys" will be reappear in the November JFP.

Ongoing trends seem to be: Ethics, Social & Political, and Philosophy of Law seem disproportionally well represented, as does Ancient.

If anyone has had the chance to study closely the JFP, please feel free to share your findings.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

As far as I can tell, Ethics and Continental seem to be very well represented this year. By contrast, there are only three jobs in Philosophy of Science (Virginia Tech, Texas Tech, and Singapore).

Anonymous said...

Of the tt-jobs devoted exclusively to the history of philosophy, nearly all of them are in ancient. I counted only 3 tt-jobs exclusively devoted to modern (whether early or late), plus another few hiring only for an AOS in any historical period.

Anonymous said...

How many applications do you figure an AOS ancient search will get? It depends on the school obviously, but can anyone give a round-about number?

Anonymous said...

I'm so glad I have a job.
This shit is grim.

word verification: metel

Anonymous said...

I wonder if Philosophy is worse off than other disciplines in the Humanities. Anyone knows of comparisons?

Anonymous said...

Looking over the JFP, I can say that I am glad I went out on the market last year instead of this year. I'm not sure how the total number of jobs (or TT jobs) stack up for these two years, but there were more I could reasonably apply for last year than there looks to be this year. And last year sucked.

Anonymous said...

@2:10 - depends on the specifics of the ad, but I'd expect any ad to get at least 80-100 apps, no matter how specialized (and obviously lots more in most cases). Not many of those apps will be genuinely qualified for an AOS ancient, but that doesn't (and probably shouldn't) stop people from trying their luck.

Anonymous said...

Duke U. is one of the schools which has a single website with statistics for each department (see URL below). It may give some degree of comfort to philosophers to see that Duke's record for Philosophy TT placement of PhDs earned in 2009 is significantly better than that of their Physics or Mathematics PhDs for that same year.

http://gradschool.duke.edu/about/stats.php

Anonymous said...

@Anon 3:35pm

I don't think the inference you're making re: tenure-track placement records at Duke is all that comforting. My impression is that PhDs in physics and mathematics are significantly less dependent on tenure-track appointments for career success. Indeed, I suspect they have some significantly more lucrative career options in the private sector. If that's correct, then I'd expect those departments to place fewer PhDs in tenure-track positions.

Anonymous said...

In sciences generally, though I'm not sure how far this applies in physics and mathematics, there are both higher expectations and more opportunities for Ph.D.s to do post-docs. Moving from grad school directly to a tenure-track job is not common.

Anonymous said...

Personal highlight was the ad (#81) by Miami University, based in Oxford, Ohio (!), which ends with a link to its 'Campus crime and safety report', noting that a hard copy is available upon request. It doesn't get more inviting than that!