Saturday, November 12, 2011

Best JFP line

Best JFP line:
Through introspection, reading, and discussions with domain experts, you will codify and formalize important, general pieces of knowledge about the world, and you will test the growing AI system’s understanding of what you’ve taught it.

Pretty much what we do in our classes anyway...

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I, for one, welcome our new robot overlords.

Anonymous said...

introspection *is* a source of knowledge about the world



WV: "disses"! for real.

Fritz J. McDonald said...

CYCORP. This ad is a prank, right?

Anonymous said...

No prank:

Cycorp!

CTS said...

@11/12, 9:05:

Well, we are part of the world. So, yeah, a little introspection could help.

More broadly, I suspect they don't think 'introspection' means what you think it means. :-)

Bearistotle said...

Call for Abstracts
Black Sabbath and Philosophy
Edited by William Irwin
The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series
Please circulate and post widely. Apologies for Cross-posting.

If you have comments or criticisms for the series, please read “Fancy Taking a Pop?” at http://www.philosophypress.co.uk/?p=1131 and join the discussion in the comments section.

Abstracts and subsequent essays should be philosophically substantial but accessible, written to engage the intelligent lay reader. Contributors of accepted essays will receive an honorarium.


Possible themes and topics might include, but are not limited to, the following: “Am I Going Insane?”: Madness in Sabbath and Foucault; Purging Fear and Pity with Sabbath and Aristotle; “War Pigs” and Pacifism; Gods who can Dance: Nietzsche, Sabbath, and Dionysus; Sabbath’s Sonic Meaning and the Devil’s Interval; “Fairies Wear Boots”: Drugs and Transcendence; “Push the Needle In”: The “Hand of Doom” and Addiction; “Solitude”: Existential Alienation and Despair; Working Class Heroes: Sabbath’s Politics; Spiral Architects and Rock Poets; “My name is Lucifer, please take my hand”: The Occult and the Virtues of Blasphemy; Sweet Leaf and Snow Blind: The Epistemology of Addiction; Is it still Sabbath without Ozzy?: The Metaphysics of Band Identity through Time; The Godfathers of Metal: Genre and Influence; Iron Man and The Wizard: Sabbath’s Mythology; “Tomorrow’s Dream”: Existential Freedom and Rebellion; Johnny Blade and Hypermasculinity; Why Scary Music Makes Us Feel Good: Sabbath and the Paradox of Horror; “Dirty Women”: Gender and Sexuality in Black Sabbath; The Fifth Member in Creativity and Performance: Is Sabbath more than the Sum of its Parts?; “Lord of this World” and the Problem of Evil

Bearistotle said...

I felt that CfA needed to be brought to your attention, but now I realize it looks like I'm just spamming your comment thread with it.

Fritz J. McDonald said...

Maybe CYCORP is going to help build the Iron Man, perhaps with a great magnetic field. Heavy boots of lead. Fills his victims full of dread.

729 not logged in said...

Cycorp has been advertising for many years. They don't always advertise each year, so this seems a surprise to a lot of people, but they have been around since the 90's and periodically advertise. It is "for real" in the sense that it is an actual company and an actual job. What this job amounts to and what the company actually achieves are another thing. A few years ago, one of my former students made it to an interview in Austin. He was not very impressed. Dodgy about the actual work involved, dodgy about the salary. The student did not pursue this option for employment (and is well-employed elsewhere with his skillz in coding and logic).

Anonymous said...

Fritz gets top post prize for mentioning Iron Man. Anyway, this is not a joke. It is for real. I interviewed for it, but made a hash of it, since I hadn't done Q logic for five years and I was so nervous I couldn't think. I now know what I should have said, of course, but too late. Besides I don't want to leave philosophy anyway, even though I may have to.

ps: I have been recently checking out LSAT questions, and I have had two thoughts about them. First, that a dog could pass it. Second, that most referees would not pass the reading comprehension section given some of the comments I have gotten on papers (I know, I know, it's all volunteer work, but still...).

Anonymous said...

http://philosopheranonymous.blogspot.com/2011/11/what-do-you-make-of-it.html

Anonymous said...

LSAT Questions?

I think the problem (aside from the Logic Games section) is that the people who write them are relative simpletons who _don't_ have a background in philosophy, so they often provide more than one correct answer as an option. So, probably taking a first-year philosophy course would give LSAT takers a big advantage, but the farther you go, the worse you're likely to do (since you'll quickly get to the point where you're smarter than the test-makers).

Has anyone else who's looked at the LSAT found that? I noticed it when I was looking over some of the non-Logic Games questions with a law-school bound student from my logic course.

Big D said...

I haven't taken the LSAT, but I had a similar experience when I took the GRE. On the essay section, you are instructed to give an argument for or a gainst a certain proposition, given a brief explanation. Being an analytically-trained philosopher, I gave an argument with only the necessary premises I deemed sufficient to establish the conclusion. My score? 3.0 out of 5.0.

I found this score to be unfair, as I had done exactly what was asked for. I picked up a guide on how to do better on the GRE, and I learned that the essays are graded by English grad students. Princeton Review's advice for scoring well on the "argument" essay? They point out that there's a positive correlation between the amount written and the score receive, so I took the GRE again, but included copious amounts of extraneous information in my argument, and received a 5.0.