Sunday, March 18, 2012

APA Session Rule #4

The commentator should get his or her comments to the main speaker by the deadline set by the program committee. However, the speaker may not change his or her paper or presentation to deflect, preempt, to respond to the comments. (Yes, I've seen this happen!)

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Philosophers Anonymous Rule # 72:
Every post should be concluded with the parenthetical, "(Yes, I've seen this happen!)"

Anonymous said...

Excellent rule!
I've seen this happen twice. Both times at the APA. Once the commentator said that the paper presented was not the paper he had been given and the comments he had prepared were completely off-topic so there was no point in reading them. Poor bugger.
Why would a presentator do such a thing? WHy not just prepare a response to the commentator?

Anonymous said...

I almost did this on my first conference talk ever. I actually asked the commentator if I could correct it since obviously it would require changes in the commentary, and was told i'd have a chance to respond anyways. Whew!

Anonymous said...

One time a distinguished philosopher gave me the comments the night before the presentation. This was a particularly miserable experience.

Glaucon said...

A few years back, the person on whose paper I was commenting managed to hit the d-bag trifecta: he significantly changed the paper he gave in light of the objections I'd made; he did this without any acknowledgement that he was doing so or, afterwards, that he'd done so; he took about 35 minutes to present his paper. Maybe he thought since I wouldn't need to give my comments, he'd just take that time.

Anonymous said...

WHARRGARBL

Anonymous said...

I once prepared a commentary on a paper by a distinguished philosopher and sent the commentary to him well in advance of the conference. He began his presentation at the conference by "apologizing" to me that the paper he was about to read was different from the one I had been provided. As he read, it soon became obvious that the paper was drastically different and my prepared commentary thus irrelevant. Thanks for the warning, pal.

Anonymous said...

Truly, ours is a profession of tremendous assholes.

Anonymous said...

Glaucon: wow that presenter was a real prick! How did you handle the situation?

Anonymous said...

I was asked to comment on a paper at APA about a week before the conference. The first commentator had to drop out. This was for a society meeting, not the main program, so I was given 20 minutes for my response. Anyway, I wrote up some comments and sent them to the author. I knew he wouldn't have much time to consider them, so I just told him when I sent them to him that I'd leave out anything he didn't want to deal with. It just seemed decent to make the offer, given the late hour. He appreciated it, but was happy with my response overall and didn't ask me to leave anything out. (My comments were critical, but in ways he found interesting.)

I've been on the other end of this too. I once had to listen to some turd's screed on my paper, first delivered to me at the session. I read them for the first time as he read them to the audience.

Anonymous said...

I presented at both the most recent APA meetings. For the Eastern I received comments about four days prior to the meeting and for the Central the day before our session! I had to email the commentator in both instances. Last year I presented at the Pacific and the comments were given to me by the deadline. Does anybody know how prevalent late comments are? If it's a common phenomenon, I can't imagine that commentary is very helpful as a rule.

Anonymous said...

My worst horror story on this: when I was very junior (and thus very nervous), the much more experienced commentator handed me the comments as we walked into the session. They were scribbled on yellow tablet paper. I obviously couldn't read them while I was presenting my own paper, so I heard them for the first time as they were being read. But the coments weren't even on my paper! The commentator noticed that I cited a prestigious philosopher in a footnote and the commentary was entirely about what a great philosopher that person was!

Anonymous said...

2:31: At least in APA-Pacific, program committee members are asked to tell the session chair to be responsible for ensuring that comments are sent on time.

Comments should be sent 4 weeks ahead. For any meeting, if you don't get them and are reluctant to contact the speaker, send e-mail to the session chair to ask for help.

Anonymous said...

I admit to being late on comments once at the APA. It was unprofessional of me I admit. My only excuse is that I had started a new job and I had a little baby and it was damn difficult to find the time (in retrospect I should have said no). But in any case, my point is that I have been a commentator on several occasions at the APA and I was never ever given a deadline by anyone which I was supposed to hand in comments. I didn't even know this was a deadline set by the program committee. Where/when do we get this sort of information?

Anonymous said...

3:10: Somebody dropped the ball. I don't know in which division this occurred (the program committees are structured quite differently). But perhaps the program committee member who arranged the session didn't tell the chair or the commentators about the 4-week guideline. Or perhaps the program chair didn't brief committee members. Four weeks is fairly standard for other professional groups.

Anonymous said...

For the upcoming Pacific APA, Commentators (for Colloquium and Symposium papers) were asked to send comments to speakers six weeks before the meeting. Those instructions are available on the conference website and were sent out to participants.

http://apa-pacific.org/current/instructions.php

Anonymous said...

One time a commenter flagged me down before this court date I had, demanded to know what I was doing there, and then kept challenging my reasons for presenting the case with a lot of irrelevant nonsense. After about 10-12 pages worth of this sort of thing, when I finally told him I had to go in, he made some sarcastic remark. Asshole.

Glaucon said...

@ Anon3:17:

I just sat there silently judging him, not really knowing what to do. When it was my turn, I remarked that my comments had been rendered otiose since the paper had been changed and gave a highly abbreviated version of them. The speaker didn't acknowledge what he'd done, either then or afterwards when I asked him about it. I couldn't tell if he was a jackass or an asshole (perhaps thefundamental distinction in moral taxonomy?). The session chair, who had to have known whwat was going on, was a jackass of the milquetoast variety.

Here's a snippet on egregious breaches of norms of professional conduct from the Pacific:

"All authors of refereed papers must present their papers as they were refereed, without substantial revisions. Speakers, commentators, and critics in all sessions should ensure that their presentations are sent to other session participants well in advance of the meeting and are not changed substantially thereafter. Such practices as witholding prepared texts and changing papers to undermine commentators' objections are egregious breaches of norms of professional conduct."

Changing one's paper out of clueless dipshittery (rather than nefariously seeking to undermine the commentator) should still count as a breach of professionalism, perhaps just not an egregious one.

CTS said...

@March 19, 2012 2:48 PM

I think there must be yet another RULE in light of this.